WHAT IS KOMBUCHA AND HOW DO YOU MAKE IT?

​Move over home brew. There is a healthier drink “grow your own” fans can create in the kitchen. Kombucha, made from a live symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast, is one of the country’s fastest growing health trends.

What is it?
Kombucha (kom-BOO-cha) is a tart-tasting fizzy beverage made by fermentation. Its sweet, tangy flavour and low sugar content have made it a popular alternative to sugar-laden soft drinks.

Kombucha is made by adding a scoby (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast) to a solution of sugar and tea. During the fermentation, the bacteria and yeast on the scoby ferment the tea and sugar to make a sour-tasting tonic. As the scoby grows, it can be broken off into sections to start a new batch. Due to its gelatinous, blob-like appearance, the scoby is also referred to as a mother culture, tea beast, fungus or mushroom. 
A jar of kombucha during fermentation has long been popular among home cooks and underground food networks. But it is becoming more readily available through retail outlets.

Why is it important?
Kombucha has a deliciously sweet, tangy flavour. It is cheap and easy to prepare and there is enormous scope for flavour variation – from herbs and spices to fresh fruit and even a slow-fermented kombucha champagne.

Nutritionally OR Sciencey
When the scoby ferments the sweet tea solution to make kombucha, it produces several useful compounds. These include beneficial acids such as acetic acid, commonly found in vinegar, which can help control “bad” micro-organisms within the gut. 
Kombucha also contains B vitamins, folic acid, tea polyphenols and antioxidants.
It is often referred to as a source of probiotics, but the amount of probiotic bacteria within kombucha brews can vary. It contains several components (acids, enzymes, bacteria and yeast) that can influence the health and balance of gut microflora. 

Move over home brew. There is a healthier drink “grow your own” fans can create in the kitchen. Kombucha, made from a live symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast, is one of the country’s fastest growing health trends.
What is it?Kombucha (kom-BOO-cha) is a tart-tasting fizzy beverage made by fermentation. Its sweet, tangy flavour and low sugar content have made it a popular alternative to sugar-laden soft drinks.
Kombucha is made by adding a scoby (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast) to a solution of sugar and tea. During the fermentation, the bacteria and yeast on the scoby ferment the tea and sugar to make a sour-tasting tonic. As the scoby grows, it can be broken off into sections to start a new batch. Due to its gelatinous, blob-like appearance, the scoby is also referred to as a mother culture, tea beast, fungus or mushroom. 

A jar of kombucha during fermentation. Photo: Science Photo LibraryKombucha has long been popular among home cooks and underground food networks. But it is becoming more readily available through retail outlets.
Why is it important?Kombucha has a deliciously sweet, tangy flavour. It is cheap and easy to prepare and there is enormous scope for flavour variation – from herbs and spices to fresh fruit and even a slow-fermented kombucha champagne.

Nutrition snapshot When the scoby ferments the sweet tea solution to make kombucha, it produces several useful compounds.

These include beneficial acids such as acetic acid, commonly found in vinegar, which can help control “bad” micro-organisms within the gut.

Kombucha also contains B vitamins, folic acid, tea polyphenols and antioxidants.
It is often referred to as a source of probiotics, but the amount of probiotic bacteria within kombucha brews can vary. It contains several components (acids, enzymes, bacteria and yeast) that can influence the health and balance of gut microflora. ​

How do you make it??
It is easy, click HERE or flick over to our Recipes page to get an easy no fuss recipe. ​

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